Anarchism, 1914–18

Internationalism, anti-militarism and war

by Matthew S. Adams, Ruth Kinna

Description
Anarchism 1914-18 is the first systematic analysis of anarchist responses to the First World War. It examines the interventionist debate between Peter Kropotkin and Errico Malatesta which split the anarchist movement in 1914 and provides a historical and conceptual analysis of debates conducted in European and American movements about class, nationalism, internationalism, militarism, pacifism and cultural resistance. Contributions discuss the justness of war, non-violence and pacifism, anti-colonialism, pro-feminist perspectives on war and the potency of myths about the war and revolution for the reframing of radical politics in the 1920s and beyond. Divisions about the war and the experience of being caught on the wrong side of the Bolshevik Revolution encouraged anarchists to reaffirm their deeply-held rejection of vanguard socialism and develop new strategies that drew on a plethora of anti-war activities.
Rights Information

Afghanistan, Aland Islands, Albania, Algeria, American Samoa, Andorra, Angola, Anguilla, Antarctica, Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Armenia, Aruba, Australia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belarus, Belgium, Belize, Benin, Bermuda, Bhutan, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Botswana, Bouvet Island, Brazil, British Indian Ocean Territory, British Virgin Islands, Brunei, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cambodia, Cameroon, Canada, Cape Verde, Cayman Islands, Central African Republic, Chad, Chile, China, Christmas Island, Cocos [Keeling] Islands, Colombia, Comoros, Congo [DRC], Congo [Republic], Cook Islands, Costa Rica, Cote d'Ivoire, Croatia, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominica, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Estonia, Ethiopia, Falkland Islands [Islas Malvinas], Faroe Islands, Fiji, Finland, France, French Guiana, French Polynesia, French Southern Territories, Gabon, Gambia, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Gibraltar, Greece, Greenland, Grenada, Guadeloupe, Guam, Guatemala, Guernsey, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Guyana, Haiti, Heard Island and McDonald Islands, Honduras, Hong Kong, Hungary, Iceland, India, Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Ireland, Isle of Man, Israel, Italy, Jamaica, Japan, Jersey, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kiribati, Kuwait, Kyrgyzstan, Laos, Latvia, Lebanon, Lesotho, Liberia, Libya, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Macau, Macedonia [FYROM], Madagascar, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mali, Malta, Marshall Islands, Martinique, Mauritania, Mauritius, Mayotte, Mexico, Micronesia, Moldova, Monaco, Mongolia, Montenegro, Montserrat, Morocco, Mozambique, Myanmar [Burma], Namibia, Nauru, Nepal, Netherlands, New Caledonia, New Zealand, Nicaragua, Niger, Nigeria, Niue, Norfolk Island, Northern Mariana Islands, North Korea, Norway, Oman, Pakistan, Palau, Palestinian Territories, Panama, Papua New Guinea, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Pitcairn Islands, Poland, Portugal, Puerto Rico, Qatar, Reunion, Romania, Russia, Rwanda, Saint Helena, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Pierre and Miquelon, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, San Marino, Sao Tome and Principe, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Serbia, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Singapore, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, Somalia, South Africa, South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands, South Korea, Spain, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Suriname, Svalbard and Jan Mayen, Swaziland, Sweden, Switzerland, Syria, Taiwan, Tajikistan, Tanzania, Thailand, Timor-Leste, Togo, Tokelau, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Tunisia, Turkey, Turkmenistan, Turks and Caicos Islands, Tuvalu, U.S. Minor Outlying Islands, U.S. Virgin Islands, Uganda, Ukraine, United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom, United States, Uruguay, Uzbekistan, Vanuatu, Vatican City, Venezuela, Vietnam, Wallis and Futuna, Western Sahara, Yemen, Zambia, Zimbabwe, Bonaire, Sint Eustatius, Saba, Curaçao, Saint Barthélemy, Saint Martin, French part, Sint Maarten (Dutch Part), South Sudan

Endorsements

Anarchism, 1914-18 provides the first systematic analysis of anarchist responses to the First World War. Examining the interventionist debate between Peter Kropotkin and Errico Malatesta which split the anarchist movement in 1914, it gives a fresh historical and conceptual account of debates conducted in European and America movements about class, nationalism, internationalism, militarism, pacifism and cultural resistance. The collection discusses the justness of war, non-violence and pacifism, anti-colonialism and nationalism, pro-feminist perspectives on violence and the potency of the myths about the war for the reframing of radical politics in the 1920s and beyond. Notwithstanding the social, cultural and geo-political changes that the war hastened, promoting forms of socialism that marginalized anarchist ideas, the essays in this volume show how the bitter divisions about the war and the experience of being caught on the wrong side of the Bolshevik Revolution encouraged anarchists to reaffirm their deeply-held rejection of vanguard socialism and develop new strategies that drew on a plethora of anti-war activities. The implications of this re-framing were not fully felt until 1968 when the student movement dubbed Soviet communism obsolete and gave expression to a creative new left politics defined by civil disobedience and passive resistance, anti-racism, feminism, civil rights and personal liberation. Far from confirming anarchism's apparent obsolescence, these currents of ideas were first contested and crystallised in anarchist milieus during the war. This book will be of interest to historians, historians of socialist thought and readers interested in anti-militarist politics and First World War studies.

Reviews

Anarchism, 1914-18 provides the first systematic analysis of anarchist responses to the First World War. Examining the interventionist debate between Peter Kropotkin and Errico Malatesta which split the anarchist movement in 1914, it gives a fresh historical and conceptual account of debates conducted in European and America movements about class, nationalism, internationalism, militarism, pacifism and cultural resistance. The collection discusses the justness of war, non-violence and pacifism, anti-colonialism and nationalism, pro-feminist perspectives on violence and the potency of the myths about the war for the reframing of radical politics in the 1920s and beyond. Notwithstanding the social, cultural and geo-political changes that the war hastened, promoting forms of socialism that marginalized anarchist ideas, the essays in this volume show how the bitter divisions about the war and the experience of being caught on the wrong side of the Bolshevik Revolution encouraged anarchists to reaffirm their deeply-held rejection of vanguard socialism and develop new strategies that drew on a plethora of anti-war activities. The implications of this re-framing were not fully felt until 1968 when the student movement dubbed Soviet communism obsolete and gave expression to a creative new left politics defined by civil disobedience and passive resistance, anti-racism, feminism, civil rights and personal liberation. Far from confirming anarchism's apparent obsolescence, these currents of ideas were first contested and crystallised in anarchist milieus during the war. This book will be of interest to historians, historians of socialist thought and readers interested in anti-militarist politics and First World War studies.

Author Biography

Ruth Kinna is Senior Lecturer in Politics at Loughborough University

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Bibliographic Information
  • Pub date: June 2017
  • English
  • 9781784993412 / 1784993417
  • United Kingdom
  • Primary Price: 115 USD
  • Manchester University Press
  • Readership: General/trade; College/higher education; Professional and scholarly
  • Publish State: Published
  • Dimensions: 216 X 138 mm
  • Reference Code: 4050